FAQ's

What should I bring with me when I come for an appointment?

When you come for your appointment remember to bring the following:

  • Insurance information
  • Referral Letter (if required)
  • Copies of results, X-rays, MRI's, CT scans etc and any other relevant information
  • List of medications (if any)

What is Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure during which the internal structure of a joint is examined for diagnosis and treatment of problems inside the joint.

What conditions are treated with arthroscopic surgery?

Arthroscopic examination of joints is helpful in diagnosis and treatment of the following conditions:

  • Inflammation: Synovitis, the inflammation of the lining of the knee, shoulder, elbow, wrist, or ankle.
  • Acute or chronic injury: Injuries to the shoulder, knee and wrist joint such as cartilage tears, tendon tears, carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Osteoarthritis: A type of arthritis caused by cartilage loss in a joint.
  • Removal of loose bodies of bone or cartilage that becomes logged within the joint.

How is arthroscopy performed?

During arthroscopic surgery, a general, spinal, or a local anaesthesia will be given depending on the condition. A small incision of the size of a buttonhole is made through which the arthroscope is inserted. Other accessory incisions will be made through which specially designed instruments are inserted. After the procedure is completed, arthroscope is removed and incisions are closed.

What are the possible complications associated with arthroscopy?

Some of the possible complications after arthroscopy include infection, phlebitis (clotting of blood in vein), excessive swelling, bleeding, blood vessel, or nerve damage and instrument breakage.

What is the recovery process after arthroscopic surgery?

It may take several weeks for the puncture wounds to heal and the joint to recover completely. A rehabilitation program may be advised for a speedy recovery of normal joint function. You can resume normal activities and go back to work within a few days. You may be instructed about the incision care, activities to be avoided, and exercises to be performed for faster recovery.

Will physical therapy be required after surgery?

Getting a full range of motion, strength, and flexibility back after surgery usually takes time. That is where pre-operative exercise, education, and post-operative physical therapy programs come in – to ensure you are physically and emotionally prepared for surgery and to maximize your recovery after surgery.

What is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the plantar fascia, is a common problem that causes pain under the heel bone often with lengthy walks and prolonged standing.

What causes a ruptured Achilles tendon?

Achilles tendon is a strong fibrous cord present behind the ankle that connects the calf muscles to heel bone. It is used when you walk, run and jump.

A high force or stress on the Achilles tendon results in rupture which can happen with activities that involve running, pivoting, and jumping. Recreational sports that may cause Achilles rupture include tennis, racquetball, basketball and badminton.

What is a bunion?

Bunion, also called a hallux valgus, is an enlargement of bone or soft tissues around the joint at the base of the big toe that results in the formation of a bump. The bone that joins the big toe with the first metatarsal bone thickens and enlarges, tightening the tendons, which in turn causes the base of the big toe to angle out resulting in a painful bony deformity.

Does ill-fitting footwear cause bunion?

Yes, ill-fitting shoes can contribute to the formation of bunions. Prolonged wearing of high-heeled or narrow shoes compresses the toes into unnatural positions.

What symptoms and problems are caused by bunions?

  • Pain with ambulation when wearing shoes
  • Swelling with red, calloused skin at the base of the big toe
  • Decreased mobility in the big toe
  • Inward turning of the big toe toward the second toe
  • Bulging of a bony bump at the base of the big toe
  • Formation of corns and calluses at the overlapping of the big toe and second toe

What is the treatment for bunions?

Initially, your doctor will recommend conservative treatment measures that include wearing properly fitted shoes with specially designed shoe inserts, padding, and taping of bunions.

Physical therapy and certain medications may be prescribed for relieving pain and inflammation.

If the above conservative measures fail to treat the bunion pain, then your surgeon may recommend a surgical procedure to remove the bunion.

  • Medical Protection Society
  • General Medical Council
  • British Orthopadeic Association
  • American Orthopaedic Foot Ankle
  • Bofas